Crystal Cockman

The LandTrust for Central North Carolina
Staff

Biography

Crystal Cockman is a staff member of The LandTrust for Central North Carolina, with a focus primarily on land protection and stewardship in the Uwharrie Region.  In her free time she enjoys backpacking, hiking, reading, flyfishing, and pretty much anything outdoors.

Education

Bachelor of science and master of environmental management graduate of Duke University.

Expertise

Environment, land protection, Uwharries.

Articles

  • ui.uncc.edu
    Oct 12, 2016
    You’re much more likely to hear than see a screech owl, so keep an ear out for their spooky song.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Oct 06, 2016
    The colorful blossoms of this wetland wildflower signal a plant with unusual qualities – seed pods that explode when touched and leaves that can relieve skin irritations, including poison ivy rashes.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 19, 2016
    North Carolina’s rarest butterfly depends for its survival on hard-to-find habitats formed by beaver ponds and fires. The butterfly is found almost exclusively on Fort Bragg artillery ranges.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 09, 2016
    With more than 400 species of deciduous trees and shrubs, willows are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere as well as in myth, legend and literature.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Aug 16, 2016
    Agriculture and agribusiness are a big part of the North Carolina economy, and several programs and funds are available to assist farmers in protecting farmland.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Aug 16, 2016
    Agriculture and agribusiness are a big part of the North Carolina economy, and several programs and funds are available to assist farmers in protecting farmland.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jul 06, 2016
    Insects can be a good indicator of high quality habitats. Here's what an insect survey in the Uwharries found. 
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jun 23, 2016
    Barn swallows are common, cliff swallows less so. But this small species of bird has a remarkable story.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jun 06, 2016
    Scientists have developed a practice called “resilience science” that looks beyond trying to predict which species will need protection and instead aims to preserve resilient places that can support diverse forms of life.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    May 09, 2016
    Not all orchids are exotic flowers found hanging from trees in the tropics. Many people are surprised to learn we have orchids growing in our woodlands right here in North Carolina.