David Walters

UNC Charlotte
Architect and town planner, professor emeritus and former director of Master of Urban Design Program, UNC Charlotte College of Arts + Architecture

Biography

David Walters is a British architect who has four decades of experience as an architect, urban designer and community planner. He is professor emeritus of architecture and urban design at UNC Charlotte, where until he retired he was the program director of the Master of Urban Design program at the College of Arts + Architecture.

Education

Walters earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in architecture from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the UK, and has practiced and taught in England, Arkansas, Mississippi, Texas, Oklahoma and North Carolina (since 1990).

Expertise

Walters is affiliated with Stantec’s Urban Places Group. Previously with The Lawrence Group, Walters has won state and national awards for urban design master plans, form-based codes and community planning projects based in Carolina communities. Walters is the author or co-author of three books: Design First: Design-based Planning for Communities (with Linda Luise Brown); Designing Community: Charrettes, Masterplans and Form-based Codes; and The Future Office (with Christopher Grech).

Articles

  • plancharlotte.org
    Oct 02, 2015
    When the Common Market leaves its South End spot next year, it will mean the loss not only of the market, which can reopen elsewhere, but the loss of its courtyard—a small spot of urban magic of a sort almost impossible to find in the city any more. Commentary
  • plancharlotte.org
    Sep 11, 2015
    Charlotte’s apartment boom plus development in popular areas like Plaza Midwood and NoDa are generating questions by residents about why new development looks the way it does and whether it could be better. Yes, it could be better, but that requires a different kind of zoning ordinance. Commentary
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 11, 2015
    Charlotte’s apartment boom plus development in popular areas like Plaza Midwood and NoDa are generating questions by residents about why new development looks the way it does and whether it could be better. Yes, it could be better, but that requires a different kind of zoning ordinance. Commentary
  • plancharlotte.org
    Sep 01, 2015
    As an important block on Camden Road faces likely development, its recent history reveals a complex narrative of a once-derelict area and a man with a vision, and shows how success changes a neighborhood. Commentary.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 01, 2015
    As an important block on Camden Road faces likely development, its recent history reveals a complex narrative of a once-derelict area and a man with a vision, and shows how success changes a neighborhood. Commentary.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Jun 02, 2015
    Although originating in British and European concepts, U.S. land use zoning today differs markedly from other countries. A new book explores how zoning codes reveal American values and prompts concern about coming challenges. Book review/commentary. 
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jun 02, 2015
    Although originating in British and European concepts, U.S. land use zoning today differs markedly from other countries. A new book explores how zoning codes reveal American values and prompts concern about coming challenges. Book review/commentary. 
  • plancharlotte.org
    Feb 22, 2012
    There I was, pencil poised over a large drawing of Gastonia. It was 1997 and I was running a public workshop to design a network of greenways and open spaces for residents to enjoy as recreational and natural amenities.  Someone in the background was fiddling with a radio. Then, as I remember the moment,  the strident sounds of a local radio station blared through the room. “Did you know there’s a foreigner working in Gastonia, helping the United Nations send troops to take away your freedom?”
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Feb 22, 2012
    There I was, pencil poised over a large drawing of Gastonia. It was 1997 and I was running a public workshop to design a network of greenways and open spaces for residents to enjoy as recreational and natural amenities.  Someone in the background was fiddling with a radio. Then, as I remember the moment,  the strident sounds of a local radio station blared through the room. “Did you know there’s a foreigner working in Gastonia, helping the United Nations send troops to take away your freedom?”
  • plancharlotte.org
    Oct 26, 2011
    Amid the pervasive gloom and depression about the future of American cities I was lucky enough to visit recently two very different American places that hold out some hopes for a sustainable future here in the USA.