Jonathan Kozar

George Mason University
Term Assistant Professor

Biography

Jonathan currently teaches Geography at George Mason University.  He is a former research specialist at the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute. He was responsible for a variety of economic and survey research projects. Responsibilities include graduate student supervision, data collection and review, report writing and review, and project management.  He also assisted in various other research capacities as needed. His research interests include urban/regional economic development, business and producer service industry growth, and urban economic transformations.

Education

Ph.D. in Geography & Urban Regional Analysis from the Univeristy of North Carolina at Charlotte.  

Articles

  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jan 10, 2013
    The first quarter 2013 Charlotte Business Confidence Index report, released Jan. 2, shows Mecklenburg County business leaders' optimism about economic prospects in the first quarter 2013 improved compared to their expectations for the fourth quarter 2012.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Oct 02, 2012
    The fourth quarter 2012 Charlotte Business Confidence Index report, released Sept. 28, shows Mecklenburg County business leaders’ optimism about economic prospects declined compared to expectations for the third quarter.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jul 02, 2012
    The third quarter 2012 Charlotte Business Confidence Index report shows Mecklenburg County business leaders’ optimism about economic prospects declined compared to their expectations for the second quarter. The overall index value, however, remains positive on business confidence overall for the third consecutive quarter.  
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Apr 25, 2012
    In this period of high unemployment, not everyone has suffered equally.  Two populations of particular concern are veterans and youth.  Goodwill Industries of the Southern Piedmont provides services to both of these populations and is a lifeline for some of the most vulnerable populations in the Charlotte region.  The agency is continuing its innovation and outreach efforts in a partnership with the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute by providing new resources to the community to understand who needs help now, and who may be at most risk in the future.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Apr 02, 2012
    As Mecklenburg County business leaders look ahead to the second quarter, their optimism about the economic outlook has improved.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jan 30, 2012
    As part of the partnership between the Women’s Summit and UNC Charlotte Urban Institute, the institute produced four quarterly reports detailing the state of women in relation to work, wages and the great recession. These reports were used to highlight the differences between men and women in the workforce, with particular attention to the differing impact the recession had on men and women.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jan 27, 2012
    To shed light on the interconnectedness of personal and professional life, the Women’s Summit developed “Women, Wages and Work,” a year-long campaign dedicated to raising awareness of the challenges facing women as a result of pay inequity and to understanding how the issues traditionally considered “women’s issues” either influence, or are influenced by, women’s experiences in the workforce.  This is the first in a series of four reports.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jan 27, 2012
    This report examines how men and women in Mecklenburg County fared during the Great Recession. It examines the overall features of the labor market and analyze some of the residual impacts the recession had on families. The goal of this report is to understand the local conditions for women and men during the recession and how these local conditions compared to those at the national level.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jan 27, 2012
    This report focuses on the disparity in earnings between men and women across industries in Mecklenburg County. The wage gap or ratio is an often cited statistic to highlight the disparity between the earnings of men and women. Most sources cite the wage gap in the United States being between 75 and 80 percent, meaning women only earn 75 to 80 percent of what men earn.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jan 27, 2012
    This report analyzes how women fared in the workplace at the national level after the Great Recession, which ended in June 2009, compared to their status before it began. This report also compares women to their male counterparts before and after the recession in terms of total job growth, job growth in the public sector, and wages earned.