Ruth Ann Grissom

Writer, conservationist

Biography

Ruth Ann Grissom serves on the board of the LandTrust for Central North Carolina. She grew up on a farm in Montgomery County and earned degrees in journalism and social work at UNC. She divides her time between Charlotte and the Uwharries.

 

Articles

  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 18, 2017
    As I left town for a quick trip over Labor Day weekend, a dozen hungry monarch caterpillars were munching away on my swamp milkweed.  When I returned 32 hours later, they had vanished.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Aug 23, 2017
    Modeled after the New Deal’s Civilian Conservation Corps, this N.C. program puts youths to work on conservation lands across the state.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jul 26, 2017
    The eastern towhee in my backyard seems to have misplaced his trill. What causes this variation in birdsong?
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jun 29, 2017
    Growing up in the Uwharries, my sister and I were country girls through and through, right down to the soles of our feet. We went barefoot much of the summer. The red clay stained our feet the color of rust.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jun 01, 2017
    Robins have adapted to humans’ routines, and one example was on display during a recent day in the garden.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    May 04, 2017
    To help native species, you don't always need to buy new plants. Here’s a way that just takes sweat equity.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Apr 10, 2017
    The vast majority of loblollies in the N.C. Piedmont are harvested long before they reach maturity. But a national park in South Carolina displays their glorious potential.  
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Mar 13, 2017
    A mysterious line of smoke blew across the field, then dissipated. Was something burning, out of sight? No, it was another kind of fire ...
  • plancharlotte.org
    Feb 09, 2017
    Blessed with an unusually rich natural diversity of plants and animals, North Carolina is losing species in large part due to habitat loss. What you can do to help – in your own yard. 
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Feb 09, 2017
    Blessed with an unusually rich natural diversity of plants and animals, North Carolina is losing species in large part due to habitat loss. What you can do to help – in your own yard.