Ruth Ann Grissom

Writer, conservationist

Biography

Ruth Ann Grissom serves on the board of the LandTrust for Central North Carolina. She grew up on a farm in Montgomery County and earned degrees in journalism and social work at UNC. She divides her time between Charlotte and the Uwharries.

 

Articles

  • ui.uncc.edu
    May 09, 2018
    On the drab trunk of a single willow oak, one of many lining the street, my eye landed on a large, oblong cluster, golden against the mouse-brown bark.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Apr 04, 2018
    April – the month that quickens the pulse of birders across the Piedmont. Songbirds also feel the stirring, the restless urge to head north. But there’s a shadow to the joy of spring migration.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Mar 07, 2018
    I enjoy the serenity of the winter landscape, but as I drove through the Uwharries, my eyes could find no rest. Every Styrofoam cup, plastic bottle and cardboard box marred the quiet beauty.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Feb 08, 2018
    Two majestic owls from the Artic tundra came south to North Carolina this winter. Only one made it back to the frozen north.  
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Dec 13, 2017
    Finding hidden value – plus inspiration for a well-loved invention – in a couple of plants many of us consider nuisances.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Nov 14, 2017
    One night, years ago, Mama looked out the window to a hay field and, for a moment, she wondered if thousands of tiny aliens had landed on Earth and settled in the grass.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Oct 17, 2017
    Few plants are as gorgeous in fall as sumacs, a native plant that can also thrive in gardens. 
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 18, 2017
    As I left town for a quick trip over Labor Day weekend, a dozen hungry monarch caterpillars were munching away on my swamp milkweed.  When I returned 32 hours later, they had vanished.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Aug 23, 2017
    Modeled after the New Deal’s Civilian Conservation Corps, this N.C. program puts youths to work on conservation lands across the state.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jul 26, 2017
    The eastern towhee in my backyard seems to have misplaced his trill. What causes this variation in birdsong?