Regional data

Regional statistics you can visualize, customize and share

Welcome to the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute's data portal. See below to explore facts about the Charlotte region from among 11 topic areas, compare your county to the metro region and the state, and explore in-depth data from our partner organizations.

Articles about data

  • Research-Informed Dropout Prevention Programs Summary Table

    As part of United Way's Collective Impact Initatiave for Children & Youth, The Larry King Center of the Council for Children's Rights conducted a comprehensive review of dropout prevention programs. This summary table presents information about research-informed dropout interventions and practices being put into action across the country.
  • School Dropout Predictors Annotated Bibliography

    As part of United Way's Collective Impact Initatiave for Children & Youth, The Larry King Center of the Council for Children's Rights conducted a comprehensive literature review of factors that influence school dropout and graduation rates.  This annotated bibliography is one of three products from this research and presents more than 40 peer-reviewed journal articles that found predictors with a statistically significant relationship to dropping out of or completing high school.  
  • Dropout Predictors Summary Table

    As part of United Way's Collective Impact Initatiave for Children & Youth, The Larry King Center of the Council for Children's Rights conducted a comprehensive literature review of factors that influence school dropout and graduation rates. This summary table is one of three products from this research and categorizes the dropout predictors by developmental timeframe (Conception to three years, preschool, elementary school, middle school, high school) and domain addressed (child factors, family factors, community factors).  
  • Charlotte region: Getting older, growing younger

    The nation as a whole is getting older, but variations in population growth and immigration can create big differences in the median age from place to place. The Charlotte region is no exception. While Mecklenburg's median age has risen only marginally, some neighboring counties are getting noticeably older.