Regional data

Regional statistics you can visualize, customize and share

Welcome to the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute's data portal. See below to explore facts about the Charlotte region from among 11 topic areas, compare your county to the metro region and the state, and explore in-depth data from our partner organizations.

Articles about data

  • Charlotte's rapid growth brings demographic changes

    Headlines have highlighted multiple demographic trends affecting Charlotte and the metro area over the last decade. “Carolinas lead the nation in Hispanic growth,” read the headline of a Charlotte Observer story in 2008. The city has ranked highly on “Best City” lists for African Americans throughout the 2000s. Moving beyond the headlines, however, is there any clear demographic picture emerging for Charlotte’s future? A glimpse at the 2009 Census Bureau data (the final estimates before the 2010 official counts are released later this spring) provides some insight.
  • The changing face of Mecklenburg

    Mecklenburg County, N.C. is home to the state's largest city, Charlotte. Most people living in Mecklenburg County today were born outside of North Carolina. U.S. Census Bureau data estimates from 2009, released earlier this fall, put that number at just over 58 percent. The new diversity of the county has some interesting twists. For instance, more people living in the county today were born in Mexico than Pennsylvania. More residents were born in El Salvador than in Tennessee. The percent of residents born in New Jersey tops that of either Georgia or Florida.
  • Environmental Quality of Life by the Numbers

    How do you paint a picture of the region’s progress on environmental issues? The Charlotte Regional Indicators Project does it by the numbers. “Environment” is one of several areas covered by the Indicators Project, and includes quantitative measures for air, water, and land. Specifically, the indicators include: unhealthy air quality days, vehicular emissions, water consumption, impaired streams, landfill waste disposal and developed acres.
  • The Surge in Free and Reduced Lunch Applicants in CMS

    Nothing is more heartbreaking than seeing a child go without. During tough economic times, more families and children must face their daily struggles with fewer resources. As the unemployment rate increased over the past several years, these struggles became more challenging and affected more people in the community. Last school year was no exception in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School System (CMS). More children than ever applied for free and reduced lunch during the 2009-10 school year.