Population change in the Carolinas from 2010 to 2011

Click the counties below for more details.

  • You can pan and zoom within the map to see what cities are within the counties.
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  • Explanation of the components of each county's population estimate are listed below the map.

Click here to read  more analysis on the two-state trend. 
For more information on long-term trends of population in the Charlotte region, click here. (Note: this map uses July 2010 to July 2011 data, so is slightly different from the 2011 calculation in this link.)


 
 

 

Where have the Carolinas experienced population growth in the last year? Recently released Census estimates show new trends in population for the counties of the Carolinas. This map shows estimated change in population from 2010 to 2011. 

Map by Keith Waters.  Source: U.S. Census Bureau estimates (calculated from July 2010 to July 2011). 

A full explanation of the terms that make up the data for each county are available at: http://www.census.gov/popest/about/terms.html.

Notes:
All the rates are expressed per 1,000 population. 

Natural Increase - Births minus deaths. The rate of natural increase expresses natural increase during a specified time period as a proportion of an area's population at the midpoint of the time period.

Net Domestic Migration - The difference between domestic in-migration to an area and domestic out-migration from the same area during a specified time period. Domestic in- and out-migration consist of moves where both the origin and the destination are within the United States (excluding Puerto Rico). The net domestic migration rate expresses net domestic migration during a specified time period as a proportion of an area's population at the midpoint of the time period.

Net International Migration - Any change of residence across the borders of the United States (50 states and District of Columbia). The estimates of net international migration are made up of four sub-components:

  1. Net international migration of the foreign born;
  2. Net migration between the United States and Puerto Rico;
  3. Net migration of natives to and from the United States; and
  4. Net movement of the Armed Forces population between the United States and overseas. The international migration rate expresses net international migration during a specified time period as a proportion of an area's population at the midpoint of the time period. Rates are expressed per 1,000 population.

Net Migration - Net domestic migration plus net international migration. The net migration rate expresses net migration during a specified time period as a proportion of an area's population at the midpoint of the time period. Rates are expressed per 1,000 population.