Jeff Michael

UNC Charlotte Urban Institute
Director

Biography

Jeff Michael is director of the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute.  A planner and attorney by training, his professional experience includes extensive work around land use, sustainable development and land conservation  issues. Prior to coming to the institute in 2003, Jeff served as director of the Wildacres Leadership Initiative and the William C. Friday Fellowship for Human Relations, one of North Carolina’s premier leadership programs.

A native of the Charlotte region (Stanly County), Jeff is often called upon by the news media and policy makers to share his professional and personal knowledge of the region, and to provide commentary on the economic, environmental and social issues confronting its communities. 

Jeff was named a William C. Friday Fellow in 1997 and an American Marshall Memorial Fellow in 2005 and has served on the boards of numerous statewide and regional organizations.

Education

JD, University of North Carolina School of Law
Master of Regional Planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
B.S. in Business Administration, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Expertise

Land use law, land conservation, regional planning, sustainable economic development, leadership development, diversity/multicultural training
 

Articles

  • ui.uncc.edu
    Oct 10, 2018
    When Mary Newsom retired as the institute’s Director of Urban Policy Initiatives on October 1, not only did the institute lose a trusted and respected colleague of seven years, but the Charlotte region lost one of its most important journalistic voices for quality planning, urban design and the value of public engagement to inform public policy.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Oct 10, 2018
    When Mary Newsom retired as the institute’s Director of Urban Policy Initiatives on October 1, not only did the institute lose a trusted and respected colleague of seven years, but the Charlotte region lost one of its most important journalistic voices for quality planning, urban design and the value of public engagement to inform public policy.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 11, 2018
    Introduction:  Located along the eastern edge of the Charlotte region, Anson feels like a world apart from its bustling neighbors to the west.  Rolling agricultural land, sprinkled with rural hamlets like White Store and Cedar Hill, gradually gives way to the rugged hills of the Pee Dee...
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Dec 13, 2017
    As 2017 closes, a look back at the institute’s almost 50-year history of regional focus and research. 
  • plancharlotte.org
    Dec 13, 2016
    Over our 50-year history at the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute, we’ve been committed to looking at the whole Charlotte region. So a growing divide – real or perceived – among urban, suburban and rural areas is something we take seriously.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Dec 13, 2016
    Over our 50-year history at the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute, we’ve been committed to looking at the whole Charlotte region. So a growing divide – real or perceived – among urban, suburban and rural areas is something we take seriously.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jun 15, 2016
    A North Carolina artist who works in red clay helps us ponder Charlotte’s agrarian roots, its aspirations and its complicated relationship with history and the arts. Commentary.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Mar 09, 2016
    The 20th century was a time when North Carolina’s leaders understood the connection between public investment in infrastructure and future economic growth. And they were savvy about timing, taking advantage of good economic periods to convince a fiscally conservative electorate to invest in critical infrastructure.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Nov 13, 2015
    A Stanly County Museum exhibit tells the story of an unusual European immigrant family and may inspire deeper thinking about issues ranging from regional history, to the importance of place and identity, to the legacy of slavery. 
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Nov 13, 2015
    A Stanly County Museum exhibit tells the story of an unusual European immigrant family and may inspire deeper thinking about issues ranging from regional history, to the importance of place and identity, to the legacy of slavery.