Annual Survey

Are you interested in lending your voice to improve your community?

Sign-up for the Charlotte community survey panel

A team from UNC Charlotte is working together to start a community survey panel here in the Charlotte region. Participants will provide their thoughts, concerns, insights, and experiences about a wide range of topics affecting the region and its’ people - and we promise we will share the results back to you!

 

The surveys will be available online and can easily be taken from a phone or tablet. You’ll also have the opportunity to earn prizes through your participation.


If you are interested in joining when it starts up in early 2018, please provide your email address here.


The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Annual Survey is an affordable means of gauging public opinion on a wide range of community issues. By sharing the cost of survey research, agencies and organizations can obtain high quality, scientific information on topics of their choice. This collaborative approach allows survey sponsors to obtain customized information on attitudes, preferences, and interests for a fraction of the usual cost of an individual survey project.

About the program

Now accepting questions for the next survey

For more than 30 years, the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute survey of Mecklenburg County residents has become an important resource for local governments and nonprofit agencies. The survey allows agencies to discern community attitudes about issues important to their work in an affordable way.

If you would like to participate in the next Annual Survey or have questions about the institute’s survey services, contact Diane Gavarkavich at d.gavarkavich@uncc.edu.

The next survey will take place in March 2018. Please reach out to Diane Gavarkavich by January 15, 2018 to participate.

What are the costs?

The cost of the first question is $1,150, with each additional question priced according to the total number of questions purchased:

Number of Questions* Fee per Question**
2 to 10 questions $1000
11 to 15 questions $900

* If you have more than 15 questions, please contact us to discuss fielding a survey for your specific project.
** The increase in cost in 2017 will allow the cell phone sample be increased to 75% of the total sample.

What’s included?

As part of our annual survey service we provide the following:

  • A representative sample of 400 adult residents of Mecklenburg County
  • Help drafting your questions in order to optimize results
  • Data breakdowns according to demographic characteristics
  • Optional dashboard for sharing survey results
     

Please inquire how we can customize our services to fit your survey research needs.
 

Articles about Annual Survey

  • Survey: Mecklenburg majority believes Earth is warming

    Almost 70 percent of Mecklenburg County residents surveyed during the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute's Annual Survey said they think there’s solid evidence the Earth has warmed in recent decades. An even larger majority said it’s a somewhat or very serious problem. (Photo: Takver, via flickr.com)
  • Mecklenburg attitudes reflect improving economy

    People in Mecklenburg County are feeling the effects of the economic recovery, according to results from the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute’s 2013 Annual Survey. Most people surveyed said their economic situation is getting better, more than at any time since 2010. (Photo: John Chesser)
  • Will optimism on economy continue post-election?

    Surveys are pointing to a new optimism about the local and national economy. Can we move beyond the election and the “fiscal cliff" so that these optimistic attitudes turn into economic realities?
  • Survey says greatest health need is preventive healthcare. Pictured: Jeffery Kline, M.D.

    Survey finds preventive care, dropouts among top concerns

    What are the greatest needs facing our community?  United Way of Central Carolinas posed this question to Mecklenburg County residents via the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute’s Annual Survey last spring. The survey found the greatest perceived community health need is preventive care, the greatest perceived need for children and youth is dropout prevention, and the greatest perceived need in housing and financial stability is job skills training.