Crystal Cockman

Three Rivers Land Trust
Director of Conservation

Biography

Crystal Cockman is director of conservation for Three Rivers Land Trust, formerly The LandTrust for Central North Carolina, which focuses focus primarily on land protection and stewardship in the Uwharrie Region. In her free time she enjoys backpacking, hiking, reading, flyfishing, and pretty much anything outdoors.

Education

Bachelor of science and master of environmental management graduate of Duke University.

Expertise

Environment, land protection, Uwharries.

Articles

  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jul 01, 2019
    When you think of rare species, your mind might turn to majestic tigers, ferocious grizzly bears or majestic elephants. But how often do you think of bogs, sandbars and the slimy rocks coated in spray? A recent Natural Heritage Program Rare Plant and Natural Communities Workshop in Hendersonville highlighted the importance of these unusual ecosystems for many of our region’s rare plants. Such environments play an important role in our state, but many are threatened.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jun 17, 2019
    Most people who visit the Uwharrie region, east of Charlotte, for recreation probably know about spots like the Uwharrie Trail and Morrow Mountain State Park. Or maybe you’re used to driving west, to Crowders Mountain State Park. However, there are a lot of lesser-known gems in the region that many tourists miss out on, and some that even locals have never been to see.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    May 30, 2019
    “The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways.” President John F. Kennedy To say that agriculture is important in North Carolina would be an obvious understatement. Agriculture and agribusiness, including...
  • ui.uncc.edu
    May 22, 2019
    From field sparrows to gnatcatchers to scarlet tanagers, from local residents to neotropical migrants from thousands of miles away, there’s a wealth of biodiversity of birds in the Uwharries near Charlotte. 
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Nov 28, 2017
    Walking a property recently, we stumbled on a tree with heavily furrowed bark. It took a few minutes of pondering, but we finally decided it was a cottonwood tree.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Oct 25, 2017
    The oldest trees east of the Rockies – some believed to be more than 2,000 years old – are found along this N.C. river.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Oct 03, 2017
    There will be no question what you’ve found if you see a star-nosed mole. The unusual animal can even detect seismic wave vibrations. Loss of wetlands, where it lives, can negatively affect this amazing creature.  
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Aug 31, 2017
    I’ve seen this cute little animal in very different places – in the N.C. mountains along the Appalachian Trail, on the sidewalk in Chapel Hill, and in Colorado while climbing Mount Elbert.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jul 17, 2017
    Some are rough and shaggy, others silvery and delicate. What these trees have in common is bark that peels away.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jun 22, 2017
    An area land trust launches an initiative inspired by the father of conservation, Aldo Leopold, that is teaching youth about the natural world and conservation issues.