Education

Find the story in the numbers. See below to explore facts about Education in the Charlotte region. See how the region's counties compare to one another and how the metro area compares to peers around the country.

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Articles

  • Empty classroom desks

    COVID-19 highlights educational inequities

    The novel coronavirus, better known as COVID-19, has changed the world as we know it. This holds true for the field of education, particularly K-12 schools in North Carolina and across the U.S. COVID-19 has exposed some glaring educational inequities that were present before the pandemic, but in many ways have been amplified during this crisis. As a result, I provide four major educational inequities that have directly impacted the most vulnerable K-12 students’ ability to learn and reach various educational academic achievement metrics.
  • Charlotte-Mecklenburg public elementary school students work in their school's computer lab. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    COVID-19 closes schools and brings on its own ‘summer slide’

    Students lose 20% to 30% of their school year learning gains over the summer and research has found that students of color, students with disabilities and those from low income families experience greater summer learning loss than their peers — and now, the coronavirus pandemic threatens to compound these losses.
  • Women working in a home office

    Five things coronavirus could change in Charlotte

    Closed bars, restaurants and breweries. Hundreds of thousands of employees working from home while trying to home-school children. Near-empty road and no toilet paper on the shelves.  The immediate impacts from the coronavirus crisis are highly visible. But the virus could have more long-lasting and farther-reaching impacts beyond the immediate unemployment and economic disruption we’re seeing. Here are five other areas the coronavirus could have an impact on our region.
  • High school graduation, 2010, North Mecklenburg High. Photo: John Chesser

    Report finds strengths, challenges in United Way’s Collective Impact initiative

    Research by the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute for United Way of Central Carolinas has found that almost 90 percent of at-risk Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools students who took part in programs from 14 local United Way-funded agencies over three or more years graduated from high school.