Environment

Find the story in the numbers. See below to explore facts about Environment in the Charlotte region. See how the region's counties compare to one another and how the metro area compares to peers around the country.

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Articles

  • Trash on an island in the Catawba River

    The biggest environmental issues facing Charlotte share a common root

    Air pollution, runoff and sediment in our waterways, disappearing open space and development chipping away at our tree canopy: Charlotte’s facing many environmental challenges with one common cause. Growth. 
  • Little Long Mountain trail view Uwharries

    Enjoy hiking? You should help build a trail

    Most people who hike trails don’t take time to think about who makes and maintains paths through the woods.  In the Uwharries, as in most recreational areas, most trail-building is done by dedicated volunteers.
  • The Birkhead Wilderness, part of the Uwharrie National Forest east of Charlotte. Photo: Dan Harvey.

    National Land Trust Rally comes to North Carolina

    The National Land Trust Rally put on annually by the Land Trust Alliance, the umbrella organization for land trusts, is in Raleigh this year. The Land Trust Alliance also administers the national accreditation program and serves as a clearinghouse and learning center for land trust staff across the U.S. The rally includes optional field trips on Wednesday and Thursday of the conference week hosted by local land trusts, giving us an opportunity to show off the Piedmont region.
  • Patterson Farms pick-your-own strawberries, Rowan County. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    The Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection: Strengthening ties to revitalize communities

    Today it’s hard for many, especially newcomers, to imagine Charlotte’s interdependency with the small towns and rural communities surrounding Mecklenburg County.  But Charlotte’s emergence as a New South city was the result of a manufacturing economy established throughout the region in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  That economy was mostly built on textiles, with its concentration not in the urban core (as was the case with Pittsburgh’s steel industry or Detroit’s auto sector), but in small towns scattered throughout the Carolina Piedmont – where brick textile mills were built along the banks of the South Fork River in Gaston County and the Great Falls of the Catawba in South Carolina, and along the rail lines that stretched in every direction to places like Kannapolis and Hamlet.