Housing

Find the story in the numbers. See below to explore facts about Housing in the Charlotte region. See how the region's counties compare to one another and how the metro area compares to peers around the country.

RI Indicators: 

Articles

  • Barbara Mackey sits on the front of her home on Joe Louis Street in Paradise. Mackey's lived in the neighborhood since she was 14 and has owned her current home since the late 1980s. Photo: Jonathan McFadden

    Fort Mill’s historic black neighborhood maintains the old, but braces for the new

    From her porch in booming Fort Mill, S.C., Barbara Mackey can point out three houses where neighbors who love her live. One takes her to church every Sunday morning. Another trims her hedges and mows her grass. A third chauffeurs her around town whenever she needs to run errands. “Here, everybody knows everybody,” says Mackey, 77.  Since she was 14, Mackey’s lived here in Paradise, a historic, predominantly black neighborhood just outside downtown Fort Mill off busy S.C. 160. Comprised of streets named after prominent African Americans, Paradise seems like its own island in this bustling Charlotte suburb.
  • Charlotte suburbs grow faster as developers seek cheap land

    Development has been sprawling. Places that were once rural now seem urban. Take Fort Mill, S.C., whose population, according to the American Community Survey, has nearly doubled since 2010. Many small towns have grown into bustling suburbs as developers search for large tracts of land to build residential communities. As the population grows, low-cost land and high volume are necessary to meet the regions demand for single family housing.
  • A new program to fund and support faculty research into some of the most pressing issues facing Charlotte is getting underway this fall, with fellowships from the Urban Institute. Photo: Nancy Pierce.

    The Urban Institute Research Faculty Fellows seek to better our region

    A new program designed to identify solutions for some of the pressing needs and issues of the greater Charlotte region is getting underway this fall at the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute. For the first time, the Institute has named a cohort of Faculty Fellows to conduct short-term research projects and work alongside community stakeholders to understand and share findings that can guide community decision-making.
  • Rickey Hall,  a lifelong west Charlotte resident who co-founded the West Charlotte Community Land Trust, and executive director Charis Blackmon in front of the first lot the group purchased, on Tuckaseegee Road.

    Can a community land trust stop gentrification in west Charlotte? This group thinks so.

    With a full-time executive director and a $200,000 grant, a three-year-old west Charlotte nonprofit is accelerating its efforts to stave off displacement with a housing strategy that’s unprecedented in this fast-developing city.