Housing

Find the story in the numbers. See below to explore facts about Housing in the Charlotte region. See how the region's counties compare to one another and how the metro area compares to peers around the country.

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Articles

  • A new program to fund and support faculty research into some of the most pressing issues facing Charlotte is getting underway this fall, with fellowships from the Urban Institute. Photo: Nancy Pierce.

    The Urban Institute Research Faculty Fellows seek to better our region

    A new program designed to identify solutions for some of the pressing needs and issues of the greater Charlotte region is getting underway this fall at the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute. For the first time, the Institute has named a cohort of Faculty Fellows to conduct short-term research projects and work alongside community stakeholders to understand and share findings that can guide community decision-making.
  • Rickey Hall,  a lifelong west Charlotte resident who co-founded the West Charlotte Community Land Trust, and executive director Charis Blackmon in front of the first lot the group purchased, on Tuckaseegee Road.

    Can a community land trust stop gentrification in west Charlotte? This group thinks so.

    With a full-time executive director and a $200,000 grant, a three-year-old west Charlotte nonprofit is accelerating its efforts to stave off displacement with a housing strategy that’s unprecedented in this fast-developing city.
  • Construction on a new, luxury apartment building in Dilworth. Photo: Nancy Pierce.

    A builder’s perspective: Housing affordability is about more than subsidies

    Charlotte has a problem with housing affordability for many of its citizens. But the solution is more complicated and nuanced than just putting more money into subsidies. The housing affordability problem is primarily a result of the combination of two basic factors: It is getting more and more expensive to develop and operate housing, while at the same time, many families don’t have enough income to meet the required prices associated with these higher costs.  
  • Volunteer interviews homeless residents for 2018 PIT count, Point-in-time Count, January 31. Photo: Peter Safir

    A new local racial equity analysis tool highlights disparities in homelessness

    According to local Point-in-Time Count data, 77 percent of people experiencing homelessness in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Continuum of Care are black. American Community Survey data indicates that only 31 percent of the general population in Charlotte-Mecklenburg is black. This is just one of the major disparities in our local housing and homelessness statistics highlighed by a new tool.