Social Well-Being

Find the story in the numbers. See below to explore facts about Social Well-Being in the Charlotte region. See how the region's counties compare to one another and how the metro area compares to peers around the country.

RI Indicators: 

Articles

  • Unity in the Community of the Foothills is a nonprofit and a coalition of black churches that are working to improve the quality of life for the citizens of Polk County and the surrounding area by providing, activities and services for the entire family. Photo: Nathan Burton, Resourceful Communities/ The Conservation Fund

    Community foundations demonstrate the importance of regional links

    Can philanthropy foster greater regional connection? Yes, according to our research for the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection project. But it’s not just the movement of money that matters, say local leaders: it’s the regional exchange of ideas about how to put that money to work that seems to make a difference.
  • Patterson Farms pick-your-own strawberries, Rowan County. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    The Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection: Strengthening ties to revitalize communities

    Today it’s hard for many, especially newcomers, to imagine Charlotte’s interdependency with the small towns and rural communities surrounding Mecklenburg County.  But Charlotte’s emergence as a New South city was the result of a manufacturing economy established throughout the region in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  That economy was mostly built on textiles, with its concentration not in the urban core (as was the case with Pittsburgh’s steel industry or Detroit’s auto sector), but in small towns scattered throughout the Carolina Piedmont – where brick textile mills were built along the banks of the South Fork River in Gaston County and the Great Falls of the Catawba in South Carolina, and along the rail lines that stretched in every direction to places like Kannapolis and Hamlet.
  • Charlotte Center City Partners' 2020 Vision Plan was adopted in 2011. Planning is underway for the next vision plan, to go through 2040. Photo: Center City Partners 2020 plan cover.

    Charlotte is planning a new vision for center city. How’d we do on the last one?

    Charlotte is a city that loves big plans and heady visions. And since the 1960s, making a new plan for the city’s center has been the most regularly repeated tradition in Charlotte visions. Last week, Charlotte Center City Partners formally kicked off their next planning effort, meant to guide the development of uptown, South End and the neighborhoods just west of Charlotte for the next two decades.
  • A new program to fund and support faculty research into some of the most pressing issues facing Charlotte is getting underway this fall, with fellowships from the Urban Institute. Photo: Nancy Pierce.

    The Urban Institute Research Faculty Fellows seek to better our region

    A new program designed to identify solutions for some of the pressing needs and issues of the greater Charlotte region is getting underway this fall at the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute. For the first time, the Institute has named a cohort of Faculty Fellows to conduct short-term research projects and work alongside community stakeholders to understand and share findings that can guide community decision-making.