Social Well-Being

Find the story in the numbers. See below to explore facts about Social Well-Being in the Charlotte region. See how the region's counties compare to one another and how the metro area compares to peers around the country.

RI Indicators: 

Articles

  • Climbing out of poverty to wealth is hard in Charlotte, research has shown. But children might struggle to reach even the middle of the income distribution over their lifetime. Photo: Samuel Zeller via Unsplash.

    How likely are Charlotte-area kids born into poverty to move up the income ladder?

    Fifty out of 50: That’s where the Charlotte area ranked in Harvard economist Raj Chetty’s influential 2014 study of economic mobility. By now, that headline finding is well-known. It’s spawned task forces and soul-searching in Charlotte for half a decade, as leaders seek a way to change the city’s dynamic and increase upward mobility. So, it’s hard to move from the bottom to the top. But what about other, less dramatic moves that can still vastly improve a person’s circumstances - say, from the lowest one-fifth of the ladder to the middle fifth?
  • The I-77 bridge (foreground) over the Catawba River, south of Charlotte. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    Why isn’t Charlotte built on the water?

    After visiting a city with a waterfront, maybe stopping for a drink and a bite to eat along whichever river or ocean it’s built along, I’m usually left with one overriding thought: “Wow, Charlotte could really use some of this.” Water plays a prominent role in the design and history of most cities, whether it be a river, bay or ocean. And Charlotte’s skyline and downtown sit tantalizingly close-but-yet-so-far from a major river and lake system. So, the question looms: Why isn’t Charlotte built on the water?  It’s a straightforward question I realized I had never actually asked, despite a decade living in Charlotte. So I called up an expert. 
  • Novel Stonewall Station construction

    Turning to a board game for insights on planning Charlotte’s growth

    It isn’t quite “Risk” or “Monopoly” or even “Settlers of Catan.” But city officials are using feedback from a new board game called “Growing Better Places: A More Equitable and Inclusive Charlotte,” as they craft the comprehensive plan and unified development ordinance that are meant to guide the next two decades of growth. 
  • Raleigh writer Scott Huler in 2015, braving the 100-degree sun along North Tryon Street beside light rail construction. The street is likely the Indian Trading Path, where explorer John Lawson walked in January 1701. Photo: Mary Newsom

    Review: In ‘A Delicious Country,’ an author rediscovers the Carolinas

    You probably have never heard of John Lawson. Scott Huler aims to change that. Lawson was an Englishman and explorer who, over two months in late 1700 and early 1701, traveled almost 600 miles through the Carolinas, including through what’s now Charlotte. His book, A New Voyage to Carolina, recorded the terrain, plants and people he found. It was, as Huler writes, one of the most important early books to emerge from the colonial South.