Transportation

Find the story in the numbers. See below to explore facts about Transportation in the Charlotte region. See how the region's counties compare to one another and how the metro area compares to peers around the country.

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Articles

  • Construction on the Blue Line extension from uptown to UNC Charlotte. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    The Charlotte region just inched closer to its first regional transit plan

    Charlotte officials moved one step closer to a regional transit plan this week, approving an agreement to hire a consultant and craft a vision for the city and a dozen surrounding counties.
  • A pedestrian-only plaza in Chester City, UK. Photo by Rachel Bradshaw on Unsplash

    Should Charlotte make one of its major streets pedestrian-only?

    Charlotte has a reputation as a car city, but many of its leaders badly want to promote more biking, walking and transit use. That’s one reason an intriguing idea kept surfacing at this week’s City Council Transportation & Planning Committee meeting: Why not take all the cars off a major street in uptown or South End, creating a pedestrian-only space?
  • Commuters fight traffic on Interstate 485 in Charlotte. The share of commuters in the region has increased, and more people are driving farther for work. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    Commuting and the Charlotte region’s economic connections

    An array of environmental, cultural and economic connections together give rise to the interdependence of the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection study region.  But none of these connections are more economically significant than the flow of workers within our regional economy. Counties within the region relied on out-of-county commuters for their workforces more in 2015 than at any point in our history: nearly one-quarter of our region’s residents had jobs outside of their home county.
  • A Charlotte City Walk in the Belmont Neighborhood. Three structure demonstrate the changes in Belmont: From left: new affordable housing apartments, historic neighborhood music venue now a private residence, a new large house. These are on Harrill Street. Photo: Nancy Pierce.

    Want to know why developers are embracing walkable urbanism? Follow the money.

    Charlotte’s suburbs are starting to look more like urban areas, and a new study is pointing to the value to be gained from promoting walkable, transit-connected, urban-style growth. Real estate experts have said they’re responding to market pressure: Businesses, workers and residents want to get from home to work to dinner without spending big chunks of their day in a car, and suburban-style developments that cater exclusively to drivers no longer cut it.