Economy

An economically healthy metropolitan region needs a vibrant urban core as well as strong suburban and rural communities. The institute offers articles and research on a variety of economic topics.
 

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Articles about economic topics

  • A mowed yard, traditional fence posts, managed grasslands and a small, forested mountain. For many, the landscape is a vital part of what makes the Uwharries home. Photo: Ruth Ann Grissom.

    Rural by Choice: Navigating identity in the Uwharries

    The narrative around rural areas has often held that people need to leave for a better chance to find success, typically in the city. But for many, leaving the place they love and call home never really feels like an option. Here are seven stories of people who are turning that narrative on its head. 
  • On Sept. 22, 2014 Charlotte Housing Authority opened access to its online application for Section 8 housing, for the first time since 2007. These photos were taken at the main Library, where CHO staff helped applicants with the process.  By 11 AM on Sept 22, 5,200 people had visited the site. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    High rent, cost burdens, and inadequate supply: Five new, key facts about housing

    Charlotte and Mecklenburg County are still facing a large gap between the supply of affordable housing and the number of residents who need it, as inreasing rents and a tight housing market are squeezing more families’ budgets and putting them at risk of housing instability, evicion and homelessness. 
  • A worker from Carter Farms in Moore County loads empty boxes onto his truck to use tomorrow, after dropping produce at Sandhills Farm to Table, subscription-based community supported agriculture and online food store that rents space at Sandhills AGInnovation Center. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    People appear to commute farther for certain kinds of jobs

    To better understand commuter flows at select sites in the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection region down to the individual level, we studied anonymized cell phone tracking data. We sought to determine how commuter connections differ between types of business districts and types of firms. By mapping the residential location of workers at a broad range of employment locations, we were able to make some judgements about the local economic impact, and community-building abilities of specific business types. 
  • Commuters fight traffic on Interstate 485 in Charlotte. The share of commuters in the region has increased, and more people are driving farther for work. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    Commuting and the Charlotte region’s economic connections

    An array of environmental, cultural and economic connections together give rise to the interdependence of the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection study region.  But none of these connections are more economically significant than the flow of workers within our regional economy. Counties within the region relied on out-of-county commuters for their workforces more in 2015 than at any point in our history: nearly one-quarter of our region’s residents had jobs outside of their home county.