Katie Zager

Social research specialist

Biography

Katie Zager is a social research specialist with UNC Charlotte Metropolitan Studies, where she works on the Quality of Life Dashboard and has worked with Carolinas Health Care system. She grew up in Anchorage, Alaska, and has also lived in Texas, California and Minnesota.

Education

Zager received a bachelor's degree in geography in 2012 from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minn. In 2014 she earned a master's degree in geography from UNC Charlotte.

Expertise

Zager works with Census data, neighborhood analyses and GIS mapping. Other interests include the relationship between health outcomes and neighborhood-level factors.

Articles

  • ui.uncc.edu
    Nov 12, 2019
    Charlotte has struggled with housing affordability in recent years, as the city faces rising rents and home prices driven by rapid growth and low supply.  But urban areas are not the only places grappling with these challenges, even though affordable housing is typically seen as an urban problem. Rural areas in the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection study region are also experiencing a severe housing shortage and affordability issue.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Nov 11, 2019
    We don’t often think about crossing state lines. Other than changes in gas prices or the availability of fireworks, there’s little visible difference as you cross from North Carolina into South Carolina, or vice versa. But that line appears to influence our behavior, at least when it comes to how we spend leisure time. 
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 30, 2019
    New data on the Quality of Life Explorer mapping tool paint a picture of how demographics are changing across Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, as well as other measures such as bicycle friendliness, voter participation and average water consumption.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 24, 2019
    To better understand commuter flows at select sites in the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection region down to the individual level, we studied anonymized cell phone tracking data. We sought to determine how commuter connections differ between types of business districts and types of firms. By mapping the residential location of workers at a broad range of employment locations, we were able to make some judgements about the local economic impact, and community-building abilities of specific business types. 
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Sep 24, 2019
    An array of environmental, cultural and economic connections together give rise to the interdependence of the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection study region.  But none of these connections are more economically significant than the flow of workers within our regional economy. Counties within the region relied on out-of-county commuters for their workforces more in 2015 than at any point in our history: nearly one-quarter of our region’s residents had jobs outside of their home county.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    May 05, 2016
    Since jobs are a good indicator of economic health, UNC Charlotte Urban Institute demographers decided to use the Quality of Life dashboard data to see whether jobs are spread evenly, per capita, across the city’s seven Charlotte City Council districts. What did we find?
  • plancharlotte.org
    May 06, 2015
    No single factor can define a “healthy community.” The newly updated Charlotte-Mecklenburg Quality of Life Explorer lets viewers assess a wide variety of community issues and indicators.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    May 06, 2015
    No single factor can define a “healthy community.” The newly updated Charlotte-Mecklenburg Quality of Life Explorer lets viewers assess a wide variety of community issues and indicators.