Chuck McShane

Charlotte Regional Business Alliance
Vice President of Research

Biography

Chuck McShane is vice president of research at the Charlotte Regional Business Alliance where he is responsible for strategic economic development, workforce and policy research and analysis. He is also a freelance writer whose work regularly appears in Charlotte Magazine and Our State. Chuck started his career as a staff reporter and copy editor at several newspapers including The Charlotte Observer and The Herald of Rock Hill, S.C.

Education

Chuck holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy, master's in public administration, as well as his master's and bachelor's in history, all from UNC Charlotte.

Expertise

Economic development, demographic change, micropolitan areas and small town dynamics, urban policy, urban history, Charlotte history.

Articles

  • ui.uncc.edu
    Aug 28, 2019
    A growing web of infrastructure and physical connections - both within the wider region and between the region and the outside world - has had a profound effect on where growth went, and where it stayed away from. People and industries in the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection study area followed trading paths, railroads, highways and, now, air service.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Dec 10, 2014
    The first major survey of Charlotte historic resources in 30 years says demolition and development have shrunk historic sections of three local historic districts. It also recommends possibly adding more historic districts, especially in northwest Charlotte.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Nov 11, 2014
    A Friday “sustainability fair” in uptown Charlotte will mark the city’s participation in America Recycles Day. And Saturday and Nov. 22 will be the annual Creek ReLeaf tree-planting events.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Oct 29, 2014
    The town of Lincolnton, population 10,500, is making it easier for manufacturers to come to town, since the textile industry has left industrial sites vacant. The installment of “Talk of the Towns” interviews Lincolnton Planning Director Laura Simmons.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Oct 29, 2014
    The town of Lincolnton, population 10,500, is making it easier for manufacturers to come to town, since the textile industry has left industrial sites vacant. The installment of “Talk of the Towns” interviews Lincolnton Planning Director Laura Simmons.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Oct 22, 2014
    Since the 2008 housing crash, there’s been talk of Americans downsizing and Millennials rejecting large houses. But recent U.S. Census data show that in the Charlotte area, homes only got bigger after 2000.
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Oct 22, 2014
    Since the 2008 housing crash, there’s been talk of Americans downsizing and Millennials rejecting large houses. But recent U.S. Census data show that in the Charlotte area, homes only got bigger after 2000.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Oct 15, 2014
    When Lake Norman flooded parts of four counties in 1963 a 660-acre area of Mecklenburg County was cut off from the rest of the county. It was accessible only by boat or a 12-mile trip through Iredell County. This became a source of conflict between Iredell and Mecklenburg counties for decades before the two counties reached a solution in 1997.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Oct 07, 2014
    The first decade of growth on the lake had been slow—a cluster of cabins here and a marina there. The lack of infrastructure and the distance from major population centers kept growth in check.
  • plancharlotte.org
    Sep 29, 2014
    In the 1980s and early 1990s, rapid growth around Lake Norman led to culture clashes between long-time residents and "those lake people." Land use and planning were at the heart of the conflict, writes Chuck McShane in this excerpt from his book, A History of Lake Norman: From Fish Camps to Ferarris.