Stanly County

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Learn about the county and its relationship to the region.
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Articles about Stanly County

  • Eastern hemlock needles and cones in Charlotte, NC

    Some mountain conifers make the Piedmont their home

    In December, the familiar Fraser fir population reaches its fleeting peak in the Piedmont as Christmas trees are harvested from farms in the North Carolina mountains and brought to market.  But two other species of conifers largely restricted to the mountains have found surprising refuge in our region — at least for the time being.
  • Nancy Gottovi, executive director of STARworks, has created a space for artists to hone and sell their crafts in the Uwharries region east of Charlotte. Photo: Jeff Michael

    How to brand a region: Searching for authentic identity in the Uwharries

    Rural communities around Charlotte are looking for new economic engines. Urban residents are looking for more outdoor recreation. That provides an opportunity for communities around Charlotte to use their public lands and waterways to fuel growth. And two areas in the region that were ahead of the curve offer lessons for other communities trying to tap this potential source of growth (one in the Uwharries east of Charlotte, and the other in Burke County). Here, we take a look at the experience of the Uwharries, and how it might inform the efforts of other communities in the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection region that are interested in tapping into the outdoor recreation industry.
  • Boaters on the Falls Reservoir outside Badin, adjacent to the Uwharrie National Forest and Morrow Mountain State Park. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    Recreation as economic development: Lessons from two approaches

    Rural communities around Charlotte are looking for new economic engines. Urban residents are looking for more outdoor recreation. That provides an opportunity for communities around Charlotte to use their public lands and waterways to fuel growth. And two areas in the region that were ahead of the curve offer lessons for other communities trying to tap this potential source of growth. 
  • A one-lane gravel road in the Uwharries. Photo: Crystal Cockman

    A changing landscape: Who are the Uwharries for?

    In the years after World War II, my dad could roam the Uwharries with his .22 and his trusty squirrel dog, a feist named Spot. A boy didn’t have to worry about trespassing on a neighbor’s property; he only had to avoid the occasional moonshine still. Despite changes in land use — and an influx of outdoor enthusiasts from across the Piedmont and beyond — boys (and girls) in the Uwharries can still enjoy a reasonable facsimile of my dad’s experience, assuming they can tear themselves away from their screens. The area’s steadily growing range of recreational opportunities provides an opportunity to draw in more visitors from across the region — but also poses challenges for locals used to long-standing traditions like hunting.