Stanly County

Background
Learn about the county and its relationship to the region.
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Articles about Stanly County

  • Ron and Nancy Bryant on their farm in the Uwharries. Photo: Jeff Michael

    Ron and Nancy Bryant: From activism to stewardship

    As Ron’s retirement approached, they turned to the faith that had brought them together and prayed for a sign to guide them to the right tract of land.  They found it along the banks of the Pee Dee River in Stanly County, as the flight of an eagle formed the shape of a cross.   Now called 3 Eagles Sanctuary, this 170-acre tract of forest and farmland is being managed for wildlife habitat and sustainable agriculture.  Ron and Nancy have gone from being activists to stewards.
  • A 2.2-mile section of Carolina Thread Trail weaves through a 358-acre permanently conserved area that’s protected by Catawba Lands Conservancy (CLC) within the Girl Scouts’ Dale Earnhardt Environmental Leadership Campus at Oak Springs in Iredell County. The trail is called Girl Scouts, Hornets’ Nest Council Trail. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    Forging connections across the Carolinas – one greenway, trail and waterway at a time

    Natural aesthetic appeal, increased economic vitality, a reason to leave your car behind, a walking and biking connection between communities in two states: Organizers hope to deliver all of that, and more, through the growing Carolina Thread Trail network of greenways, waterways and trails.
  • Unity in the Community of the Foothills is a nonprofit and a coalition of black churches that are working to improve the quality of life for the citizens of Polk County and the surrounding area by providing, activities and services for the entire family. Photo: Nathan Burton, Resourceful Communities/ The Conservation Fund

    Community foundations demonstrate the importance of regional links

    Can philanthropy foster greater regional connection? Yes, according to our research for the Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection project. But it’s not just the movement of money that matters, say local leaders: it’s the regional exchange of ideas about how to put that money to work that seems to make a difference.
  • Youth visit Growing Change in Scotland County, an aquaponics program operated by Smyrna UMC and Wingate UMC in Union County, and Wingate University, to learn about college enrollment opportunities. Photo: Nathan Burton, Resourceful Communities/ The Conservation Fund

    How does philanthropy vary across, and connect, the greater Charlotte region?

    Charitable giving is an invisible thread binding people and communities together across the 32-county Carolinas Urban-Rural Connection study region — but how much people give, and what resources are available, varies from place to place.